Friday, March 10, 2017

THE POTATO KING - #PPBF

 Last week I was thinking of Spring. Today, SNOW is falling again. What a difference a week makes. Today is a good day to curl up with a cup of cocoa and a plate of cookies. (Okay, every day is a good day for that!) But--
Have you ever wondered why we eat what we eat?
Owlkids Books, Inc. from Canada published a translation of a book from Germany that shares one story. Whether it's legend or truth, the people of Germany believe! 

 
Title: THE POTATO KING
Author/Illustrator: Christoph Niemann
Publisher: OwlKids Books, 2015
Intended Ages: 3-7
Themes: Food, Myth

Opening Line: "There was once a king called Fritz. One day he heard about a new wonder plant from South America: the potato."
Synopsis: A retelling of a legend in which King Frederick the Great of Prussia (King Fritz) uses cunning trickery to convince his unwilling subjects to eat an ugly new food.

What I like about this book: Did you make potato "stamps" in art class? I did. And this book is illustrated with a combination of potato photography and potato stamped prints. Everything potato! With spare text, this book got me thinking about that opening question. Some plants used for foodstuffs have spread around the world. Who championed these invaders? And the reverse logic used by the king may tip off kids to a few of their parents' tricks. Wink. Wink. We know who we are.

Resources/Activities:
  • If you don't know what a potato print is--watch this New York Times video post about the legend behind the book (it uses Niemann's imagery)
  • If kids are old enough to carve with a knife, let them make a potato stamp. If they aren't, make the stamps for them and let them stamp away! Wrapping paper or framed artwork alert!
  • Cook your favorite potato recipe. YUM.
  • Read a stack of potato books. Some I've read: ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO by Cynthia DeFelice (A Strega Nona type folktale), THE ENORMOUS POTATO by Aubrey Davis (folktale), POTATOES, POTATOES by Anita Lobel (explaining war to children). More recommended by Windham County Farm to School. I wasn't able to find a copy yet, but I'm adding Kathleen Lindsey's SWEET POTATO PIE to my reading list.
  • For older readers. Make a list of favorite foods. Research whether that food is native to your area.

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy my selection this week. I love to hear what you think about it in the comments!

This review is part of PPBF (Perfect Picture Book Friday) where bloggers share great picture books. Organized and curated by author Susanna Leonard Hill, she keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. #PPBF

Friday, March 3, 2017

SING A SEASON SONG - #PPBF

Where I live, the winter has been mild this year and my thoughts have turned to Spring . . .
 

 
Title: SING A SEASON SONG

Author: Jane Yolen
Illustrator: Lisel Jane Ashlock
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2015
Intended Ages: 4-8
Themes: The seasons, Writing in rhyme, Animals

Opening Line: "Snow, snow, shiver and blow.
Icicle popsicles drip, drop and dropsicles."
Synopsis: Beginning and ending with winter, this book celebrates the cyclical nature of the seasons.

What I like about this book: The text and illustrations marry perfectly. A few animals are mentioned in the text, then the illustrations add layers of detail, together bringing the seasons to life. I felt the whoosh of wings and the thump of paws. Nature takes center stage, with children and adults tucked into the backgrounds. The scenes come vividly to life with something new to feel or see in several re-readings. Picture book aficionados may smile at the owl prominent in the first spread, remembering OWL MOON. Yolen's text is a rhythmic read aloud treat. A longtime Yolen fan, this is a new favorite for me. While each season may have unpleasantries, they aren't mentioned here! The tone of this book is a gentle celebration of the repeating cycle.

Resources/Activities:
  • List the best and worst things about each season. Compare lists. If you were a butterfly, would your answers be different? A polar bear? A frog?
  • The internet has many kid-friendly activities to explore the seasons. Start with Pinterest?
  • Teachers.net has grade level appropriate lesson plans about the seasons.
  • Start a seasonal scrap book, recording your observations on the first day each month.
  •  What is your favorite food to each during each season? Make some!
Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy my selection this week. Have you read this one? I'd love to hear your thoughts about it in the comments!

This review is part of PPBF (Perfect Picture Book Friday) where bloggers share great picture books. Organized and curated by author Susanna Leonard Hill, she keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. #PPBF

Friday, January 27, 2017

Adding to Others' Accolades #PPBF

     My post today won't be linked to the Perfect Picture Book Friday bunch, because there's nothing new. New to me--yes. But these books have been reviewed a lot of places already. However, sometimes after I read the books that are recommended, I think "eh." And sometimes I think "YES!" So I thought I would share a few that made me say "YES!" even though they have already been plentifully reviewed. Perhaps you forgot about them and could use another nudge.
   
I love Deborah Freedman's book, SHY. Maybe it's because I identify with the subject matter. As an adult, I take that big breath before I walk into a group of strangers. As a child, I just sat on the sidelines. And the way Deborah uses perspective and  the physical gutter (the center of the book) in her artwork is brilliant. I've seen some reviews that found fault with the lack of options to deal with shyness in the story, but I found it a great way for kids to discuss the subject at all. To recognize that some kids might need help with introductions, and an example to the shy kids that a happy ending is a possibility if they make the effort to connect. You can find a complete review of this book at Unleashing Readers.




     Big thumbs up to the following stories as well:
     TELL ME A TATTOO STORY by Alison McGhee  (reviewed by Joanna Marple)
     A SQUIGGLY STORY by Andrew Larsen (one review at Pickle Me This) and last but not least
     Teeny Tiny Toady by Jill Esbaum (there aren't any caps in the title, so I couldn't bring myself to do it here!) (reviewed by Sue Heavenrich).
 
      Just wanted to let other reviewers know that your reviews ARE being read and appreciated! It's hard to keep up with everything and reviews are one way to pare down the library list.

Friday, January 20, 2017

BOB, NOT BOB! #PPBF


     Can anyone find humor in being sick? Co-authors Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick did.
     This book is a fantastic read aloud!
     If you know anyone, big or small, who has a stuffy-head---this is definitely the book for them.
 
Title: BOB, NOT BOB!
Author: Co-authors Liz Garton Scanlon & Audrey Vernick
Illustrator: Matthew Cordell
Publisher: Disney/Hyperion, February 14, 2017
Intended Ages: 4-7
Themes: Humor, Illness, Family

Opening Line: "Little Louie wasn't all that little. It wasn't like he needed his mom every minute of the day."
Synopsis: When Louie gets a bad cold, he wants his mom, but every time he tries to call her ("Mom"), the family Dog, Bob, comes running instead.

What I like about this book: The Spoiler is printed right on the cover, and kind of revealed in the synopsis, so I guess it's okay to share it. This book is to be read as if you have the worst cold ever. You know that voice. That pitiful, muddled, croaky voice that pleads for sympathy. That voice transforms a sick day into hilarity. The illustrations amp up the family dog's enthusiasm and glee, compounding the chaos and the protagonist's frustration. The conflict is resolved with a heart-warming Awww.

Resources/Activities:
  • Make a list of things that make you feel better when you're sick
  • Why is the first line of the story important? Discuss how people act differently when they don't feel well
  • Discuss the differences between dogs and cats. Would the story be as funny if Bob was a cat? A sibling? A mouse? A dinosaur?
  • Read this book with SICK SIMON. Discuss which you prefer and why.

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy my selection this week.  I haven't read any other book like this, if you have, I'd love to hear about it in the comments!

This review is part of PPBF (Perfect Picture Book Friday) where bloggers share great picture books. Organized and curated by author Susanna Leonard Hill, she keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. #PPBF


Note: My review is based on a review copy received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. No other compensation was received.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Friday, November 11, 2016

CHICKEN in SPACE #PPBF

The author of the book I'm high-lighting today is a local author (local to me, anyway) who burst onto the scene in 2013 with his debut picture book, Warning: Do Not Open This Book, a zany madcap story of monkeys and mayhem. I think this one is even better!

Title: CHICKEN in SPACE

Author: Adam Lehrhaupt 
Illustrator: Shahar Kober
Publisher: Harper Collins, 2016
Intended Ages: 4-8 
Themes: Imagination, Animals, Friendship
Opening Lines:  "Zoey wasn't like the other chickens.
                             She had dreams. She had a plan. She had a pig."
Synopsis: Zoey the chicken finds a way to make her dream of space exploration come true.

What I like about this book: Just reading the title out loud, I hear an "announcer's" voice in my head--the melodrama, the echo. And that sets the scene perfectly for the imaginative main character who views the world through a rose-colored lens. Zoey's world is one where wishes can come true, if you look at things the right way. The illustrator nails the facial expressions that bring the barnyard characters to life and subtle details let the reader know this isn't your ordinary barnyard. It's one where satellite dishes are installed on doghouses. Melding hilarity and heart, there's a chicken in an aviator's hat.And there's pie.

Resources/Activities:


  • Whet your appetite with the Chicken in Space trailer:
  • Share a post-election moment. Read all of the author's books (four now!) and vote for your favorite.
  • Eat pie! So many varieties . . . YUM!
  • Brainstorm what you think Chicken's next adventure might be. 
  • Brainstorm alternate (imaginative!) uses for common household items. What could be used undersea? What could be used in space?
  • Take your own imaginative adventure. Examples: Build a couch-ship, a bed rocket, a sheet fort.
  • Which friend(s) would you want to take on an imaginative adventure? Why?

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy my selection this week. 
This review is part of PPBF (Perfect Picture Book Friday) where bloggers share great picture books. Organized and curated by author Susanna Leonard Hill, she keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. #PPBF

Friday, October 28, 2016

HALLOWEENSIE 2016

     There's no Perfect Picture Book Friday post today because--it's Halloweensie time!

     If you write for children and you aren't familiar with Halloweensie, get over to author Susanna Leonard Hill's blog and read about it! I'll wait. In brief, this is a brief--weensie--Halloween story contest. 100 words or less, using the magic words (this year: spider, moon and ghost).

     Susanna's holiday contests always put me in the spirit. All of the stories are linked to her blog so everyone can read the myriad of ways different writers approached a simple story prompt. After I post mine, I'll be heading over to start reading.

     My story this year squeaks in at 99 words!



Halloween Costume Countdown by Wendy Greenley

Sometimes it’s hard to find a good costume.
Spider tried being an eight-legged ghost.
“Hi, Spider!”
Eight-legged superhero?
“Hi, Spider!”
Eight-legged rock star?
“Hi, Spider!”
Spider sagged. “Phoeey! Everyone guesses it’s me.”
“I understand. It’s hard to hide my shell,” said Snail.
“Same problem with my wings,” said Moth.
“Don’t complain to me,” said Centipede.
They agreed to help each other create monstrously clever costumes, so no one would recognize them.
“Monstrously clever! That’s it!” said Spider.
By moonlight, the four friends painted, snipped and sewed.
Legs, wings, shells? Check! Check! Check!
“Trick or Treat!” shouted four matching Franken-bugs.


So- be careful when you open the door this year for trick or treaters, lol.
Thanks for stopping by. Happy Halloween everyone!

Friday, October 21, 2016

WE FOUND A HAT - #PPBF

 High-lighting lesser known authors and artists is fun for me. I feel like I'm uncovering hidden gems. But sometimes the big names blow me away and I have to shout their praises.

Title: We Found a Hat

Author/Illustrator: Jon Klassen
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2016
Intended Ages: 4-8 
Themes: Animals, Temptation, Friendship
Opening Lines: "We found a hat
                             We found it together."
Synopsis: Two turtles find a hat. It looks good on both of them. But there are two turtles, and only one hat.

What I like about this book: Jon Klassen is the master of understatement and the power of single glances. His newest addition to his "hat cycle" of stories adds a layer of tenderness and friendship to his spot-on deadpan humor. This is another story that leaves the emotional inner story to the reader to fill in. Klassen is the master of what happens in the story, off the page. The limited, muted palette keeps the focus squarely on the text and those expressive eyes. Constructed in three chapters, the 56 pages fly by. I believe it's appropriate for even young toddlers, age 2 and up.

Resources/Activities:

  • Read the author's hat trilogy (This Is Not My Hat, I Want My Hat Back and We Found a Hat). Discuss which you like best, and why
  • Talk about things you have. Which would you share? Why or why not? Does it matter if it's something that can be returned, or something gets consumed (like cookies)?
  • Brainstorm alternate endings for this book. Could they have taken turns wearing the hat? Made another hat? Could one turtle have taken the hat? How does the choice of an ending affect the characters' friendship?
  • Share something with a friend.
  • Buy a new hat for yourself or to donate to charity. Why do you pick the one you do?

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy my selection this week. 
This review is part of PPBF (Perfect Picture Book Friday) where bloggers share great picture books. Organized and curated by author Susanna Leonard Hill, she keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. #PPBF